Saturday, March 2, 2013

Review: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

The Book ThiefTitle: The Book Thief
Author: Markus Zusak
Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers
Release Date: 14th March 2006
Find on: Goodreads, Amazon

Quick Review: It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery....

Narrated by Death, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a young foster girl living outside of Munich in Nazi Germany. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist – books. Soon she is stealing books from Nazi book-burnings, the mayor's wife's library, wherever they are to be found.

With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, Liesel learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids, as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement.

This is an unforgettable story about the ability of books to feed the soul.


Detailed Review: I so loved this book! It was so different from many books I read this year that I think it just made its way to the list of my most-loved books!

These are the characters that I cherished so much in this book:

Death: The main narrator in the story. After I read it, it gave me the impression was just a normal person that helped many souls travel up to heaven or wherever they we're supposed to go to. And I loved the part where he wished that Rudy hadn't died so he and Liesel could be together. 

See, even death has a heart.

Liesel Meminger: I was intrigued by the book thief herself, who couldn't read at first but had developed a love towards books. I loved her nobleness and her curiosity and many other things. But what I loved the most was still her love for many of the people that were dearest to her. My heart was going to break into two when she wailed and howled because her foster parents and Rudy were dead. 

Hans Hubermann: He was the best accordionist in the world and he taught Liesel how to roll a cigarette. He gave Liesel her first book and taught her how to read. He accompanied her after her perpetual nightmares. He was a Jewish-lover. He was good to everyone he met. To me, he is the true hero in the story.

Rosa Hubermann: She calls the people she loves Saumensch and Saukerl and cooks her horrible-tasting pea soup daily. She is calm when the waves are raging. And she snores a lot. 

Max Vandenburg: He wrote two books that impacted Liesel's life: The Standover Man and The Word Shaker. Like Liesel, I loved the book after I read them and noticed that underneath his words were the words Hitler wrote in conjunction with his ideas of purity.

Rudy Steiner: Liesel's best friend and a good athlete. He loved Liesel and always asked for a kiss when he did a favour. Even when he waded into a river to get her a book. In the end. he got the kiss. But it was too late. He was already dead.

Ilsa Hermann: The mayor's wife. She knows that Liesel has been stealing from her library ever since she's shown her the books there. And she actually cares for Liesel like a real mother. She asks the book thief to write a book. 

In the end. I was crying with relief and grief, because Liesel is alive but the people she loves are dead. She was alive because she was reading the book she wrote during a bomb raid in the basement. I loved all the characters. I loved everything about the book and how it was written.

I want to watch the movie now... Boo hoo hoo...

Final Review: I followed Liesel's life with interest and noted how she affected many people's lives as her life converges with others. I cried when she cried and laughed when she laughed. I love you, Liesel. And remember that your foster parents love you too. And so does Rudy and Max. All of us do.

Final Rating: 6/5 "Awesome, Amazing and Amazing!!!!!!" (No, there is nothing wrong with the rating. It's seriously what I think)

Your Reviewer: